1534 14th Street  Santa Monica, California 90404   Schedule an Appointment 310-393-8218
Santa Monica Pet Medical Center
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Santa Monica Pet Medical Center 90404 | West Los Angeles Veterinarians | Santa Monica Animal Hospitals Santa Monica Pet Boarding | Pet Grooming | Open 7 Days Per Week | Emergency Pet Hospital
FAX US AT (310) 393-8198
HOURS OF OPERATION MON 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM TUE 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM WED 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM THU 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM FRI 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM SAT 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM SUN 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM NO DOCTOR ON SITE WEEKDAYS UNTIL 8:30 AM
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On-Site Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory For Pets

What kinds of laboratory tests are available? Your veterinarian will take into account your pet's symptoms, breed, age and sex when recommending laboratory tests. The following are the most common laboratory tests our hospital: Complete Blood Count (CBC) A CBC measures the number of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets in a sample of blood. The numbers of each type of cell give your veterinarian information to help him diagnose anemia, infections and leukemia. If your pet is undergoing treatment for a condition, a complete blood count can help your veterinarian monitor how your pet is responding to the treatment. Urinalysis (UA) Laboratory testing of your pet's urine will help your veterinarian detect the presence of specific substances that normally do not appear in urine, including protein, sugar, white blood cells or blood. Measuring the dilution or concentration of urine can also help your veterinarian diagnose illness. Urinalysis can be helpful in diagnosing urinary-tract infections, diabetes, dehydration, kidney problems and other conditions. Blood-Chemistry Panel A blood-chemistry panel measures your pet's electrolytes, enzymes and chemical elements of his blood such as calcium and phosphorous levels. These measurements help your veterinarian determine how your pet's organs, such as kidneys, pancreas and liver, are currently functioning. Blood-chemistry panels also help your veterinarian accurately diagnose and treat illness, as well as monitor your pet's response to treatment. Your veterinarian may also use the results of a blood-chemistry panel to determine if further testing is needed.  Your veterinarian may recommend a chemistry panel to obtain your pet's baseline values, which can be compared to later tests. Any differences between the baseline values and values measured at a later time will help your veterinarian diagnose new problems.
During your pet's routine wellness exam or if it is suspected that something is wrong, your veterinarian may wish to run laboratory tests using a sample of your pet's blood, urine, skin, hair or feces. These tests are important to help your veterinarian understand your pet's health status.  When your pet is healthy, your veterinarian may run laboratory tests, such as a complete blood count (CBC), chemistry panel and urinalysis, to establish your pet's "baseline" values. Then, if your pet ever gets sick, your veterinarian will compare your pet's current laboratory results to his previous baseline value to determine if the current values are abnormal.  When your pet is sick, laboratory test results will help your veterinarian confirm the presence of certain illnesses and rule out other diseases. Your veterinarian may also run laboratory tests during treatment to track the path of the disease and see how your pet responds to treatment.  If your pet is scheduled for surgery, your veterinarian may run pre- surgical screening tests in order to determine if your pet is at risk of complications while under general anesthesia. These screening tests may be recommended for pets of all ages, including young, healthy pets.  How quickly will I learn the results of my pet's lab tests?  It depends, if we run the test on our in-house Idexx lab equipment, you will have the results in less than an hour.  If, however, your veterinarian decides to send the sample to our referral laboratory, results will be in between 24-72 hours for most tests.
Test for Feline Immunodeficiency Diseases Your veterinarian may recommend a test to determine whether or not your cat has contracted feline immunodeficiency virus or feline leukemia virus. Your veterinarian will take a blood sample to perform an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to diagnose these viruses. Laboratory testing can help catch many conditions early before they become serious illnesses, so be sure to ask your veterinarian about which tests your pet may need during your pet's next wellness exam.
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Santa Monica Veterinarians Mary Isaacs DVM, Anthony George DVM, Michael Yuan DVM, Annie Hernandez DVM, Reshma Bijlani DVM, Amelia Harris DVM, Helene Tolliver DVM,
Veterinary Laboratory Diagnostics
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Santa Monica Pet Medical Center 90404 | West Los Angeles Veterinarians | Santa Monica Animal Hospitals Santa Monica Pet Boarding | Pet Grooming | Open 7 Days Per Week
During your pet's routine wellness exam or if it is suspected that something is wrong, your veterinarian may wish to run laboratory tests using a sample of your pet's blood, urine, skin, hair or feces. These tests are important to help your veterinarian understand your pet's health status.  When your pet is healthy, your veterinarian may run laboratory tests, such as a complete blood count (CBC), chemistry panel and urinalysis, to establish your pet's "baseline" values. Then, if your pet ever gets sick, your veterinarian will compare your pet's current laboratory results to his previous baseline value to determine if the current values are abnormal.  When your pet is sick, laboratory test results will help your veterinarian confirm the presence of certain illnesses and rule out other diseases. Your veterinarian may also run laboratory tests during treatment to track the path of the disease and see how your pet responds to treatment.  If your pet is scheduled for surgery, your veterinarian may run pre-surgical screening tests in order to determine if your pet is at risk of complications while under general anesthesia. These screening tests may be recommended for pets of all ages, including young, healthy pets.  How quickly will I learn the results of my pet's lab tests?  It depends, if we run the test on our in- house Idexx lab equipment, you will have the results in less than an hour.  If, however, your veterinarian decides to send the sample to our referral laboratory, results will be in between 24-72 hours for most tests.
What kinds of laboratory tests are available? Your veterinarian will take into account your pet's symptoms, breed, age and sex when recommending laboratory tests. The following are the most common laboratory tests our hospital: Complete Blood Count (CBC) A CBC measures the number of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets in a sample of blood. The numbers of each type of cell give your veterinarian information to help him diagnose anemia, infections and leukemia. If your pet is undergoing treatment for a condition, a complete blood count can help your veterinarian monitor how your pet is responding to the treatment. Urinalysis (UA) Laboratory testing of your pet's urine will help your veterinarian detect the presence of specific substances that normally do not appear in urine, including protein, sugar, white blood cells or blood. Measuring the dilution or concentration of urine can also help your veterinarian diagnose illness. Urinalysis can be helpful in diagnosing urinary-tract infections, diabetes, dehydration, kidney problems and other conditions. Blood-Chemistry Panel A blood-chemistry panel measures your pet's electrolytes, enzymes and chemical elements of his blood such as calcium and phosphorous levels. These measurements help your veterinarian determine how your pet's organs, such as kidneys, pancreas and liver, are currently functioning. Blood-chemistry panels also help your veterinarian accurately diagnose and treat illness, as well as monitor your pet's response to treatment. Your veterinarian may also use the results of a blood-chemistry panel to determine if further testing is needed.  Your veterinarian may recommend a chemistry panel to obtain your pet's baseline values, which can be compared to later tests. Any differences between the baseline values and values measured at a later time will help your veterinarian diagnose new problems.
Test for Feline Immunodeficiency Diseases Your veterinarian may recommend a test to determine whether or not your cat has contracted feline immunodeficiency virus or feline leukemia virus. Your veterinarian will take a blood sample to perform an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to diagnose these viruses. Laboratory testing can help catch many conditions early before they become serious illnesses, so be sure to ask your veterinarian about which tests your pet may need during your pet's next wellness exam.
Santa Monica Veterinarian Reshma Bijlani DVM
1534 14th Street Santa Monica, California 90404 Schedule an Appointment
Santa Monica Pet Medical Center