1534 14th Street  Santa Monica, California 90404   Schedule an Appointment 310-393-8218
Santa Monica Pet Medical Center
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Santa Monica Pet Medical Center 90404 | West Los Angeles Veterinarians | Santa Monica Animal Hospitals Santa Monica Pet Boarding | Pet Grooming | Open 7 Days Per Week | Emergency Pet Hospital
FAX US AT (310) 393-8198
HOURS OF OPERATION MON 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM TUE 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM WED 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM THU 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM FRI 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM SAT 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM SUN 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM NO DOCTOR ON SITE WEEKDAYS UNTIL 8:30 AM
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DENTAL PROPHYLAXIS (CLEANING)   Step 1. Supragingival cleaning: This is cleaning the area above the gumline. It is usually accomplished by mechanical scalers in our animal patients. This increases the speed that the cleaning can be performed, which decreases anesthetic time. Step 2. Subgingival cleaning: This is cleaning the area under the gumline. In our animal patients, this is one of the most important steps. The subgingival plaque and calculus is what causesperiodontal disease. This is the most common ailment diagnosed in ALL animal patients. Cleaning the tooth surface will make the teeth look nice, but in reality has done little medically for the patient. Step 3. Polishing: The mechanical removal of the plaque and calculus causes microscopic roughening of the tooth surface. This roughening increases the retentive ability of the tooth for plaque and calculus, which will buildup faster and increase the rapidity of periodontal disease progression. Polishing will smooth the surface and decrease the adhesive ability of plaque. Step 4. (Subgingival/Sulcal) Lavage: The scaling and polishing of the teeth will cause a lot of debris to become trapped under the gums. This will cause local inflammation, as well as increase the chance of future periodontal disease. For this reason we gently flush the gingiva with an antibacterial solution, or if periodontal disease is present, we will use saline solution. Step 5. Fluoride treatment: This is the use of fluoride foam to impregnate the teeth with fluoride, since animals don't usually get their teeth brushed. The benefits of fluoride are that it hardens the dentin, decreases tooth sensitivity, and is reported to retard the formation of Feline Oral Resorptive Lesions, and be anti-plaque. Step 6. Treatment planning: This step is where the teeth and entire oral cavity are evaluated, using not only our eyes, but a periodontal probe to determine if there is a periodontal pocket. Finally, dental radiographs are taken to determine the extent of the disease process present. Using all of these modalities, a plan is developed (with the owners input) to reestablish the patient's oral health. Step 7. Dental Charting: All of the pertinent oral findings and treatment rendered and planned in the future is placed on a dental chart in the patients permanent medical record. This will allow the veterinarian to follow the patients progress (or regression) through the years. These are the steps that we follow to ensure that the patient leaves with a clean mouth. However, dental care does not end there. Within 24 hours, plaque has already started to form on the teeth, and the periodontal disease process starts over. This is where Home Care comes in. Imagine what would happen in your mouth if you never brushed your teeth, all the cleanings in the world won't keep your mouth healthy.
A dental prophylaxis is performed not only to clean the teeth, but also to evaluate the oral cavity for any other problems that might be present. The cleaning not only includes what you can see, but also the area under the gumline, which is the most important part. For this reason, "Non-anesthetic" cleaning is not a viable option. The area under the gumline, as well as the inside of the mouth is not cleaned effectively. In addition, the teeth are not polished, which as we know will leave the cleaned surface rough and increase the adherence of plaque bacteria and hasten dental disease. We have devised a seven-step prophylaxis to give our patients the maximum benefit available.  Before the prophaxis can begin, the patient must be placed under general anesthetic. This will greatly increase patient comfort and effectiveness of cleaning. In addition, it allows us to place an endotracheal tube in the patient's trachea. This will protect the lungs from the bacteria that are being removed from the teeth. Periodontal disease is a major health risk for your pet.  It is the most common disease in small animals.  It is painful, but  frequently, pets with oral pain “suffer in silence”.  However, periodontal disease is easily PREVENTABLE.  Let us give your pet a complete dental check up and advise you on how to keep your pet's teeth clean and healthy for a long and pain-free lifetime!

Teeth Cleaning For Pets

New Clients New Clients
Santa Monica Veterinarians Mary Isaacs DVM, Anthony George DVM, Michael Yuan DVM, Annie Hernandez DVM, Reshma Bijlani DVM, Amelia Harris DVM, Helene Tolliver DVM,
Teeth Cleaning For Pets
Veterinary Hospital Websites Ireland, Ltd.    © 2017  All Rights Reserved   All Images & Content Subject to Copyright IE Reg. #542539 Vet Web Designers - Your Rx For Animal Hospital Website Design
Santa Monica Pet Medical Center 90404 | West Los Angeles Veterinarians | Santa Monica Animal Hospitals Santa Monica Pet Boarding | Pet Grooming | Open 7 Days Per Week
DENTAL PROPHYLAXIS (CLEANING)   Step 1. Supragingival cleaning: This is cleaning the area above the gumline. It is usually accomplished by mechanical scalers in our animal patients. This increases the speed that the cleaning can be performed, which decreases anesthetic time. Step 2. Subgingival cleaning: This is cleaning the area under the gumline. In our animal patients, this is one of the most important steps. The subgingival plaque and calculus is what causesperiodontal disease. This is the most common ailment diagnosed in ALL animal patients. Cleaning the tooth surface will make the teeth look nice, but in reality has done little medically for the patient. Step 3. Polishing: The mechanical removal of the plaque and calculus causes microscopic roughening of the tooth surface. This roughening increases the retentive ability of the tooth for plaque and calculus, which will buildup faster and increase the rapidity of periodontal disease progression. Polishing will smooth the surface and decrease the adhesive ability of plaque. Step 4. (Subgingival/Sulcal) Lavage: The scaling and polishing of the teeth will cause a lot of debris to become trapped under the gums. This will cause local inflammation, as well as increase the chance of future periodontal disease. For this reason we gently flush the gingiva with an antibacterial solution, or if periodontal disease is present, we will use saline solution. Step 5. Fluoride treatment: This is the use of fluoride foam to impregnate the teeth with fluoride, since animals don't usually get their teeth brushed. The benefits of fluoride are that it hardens the dentin, decreases tooth sensitivity, and is reported to retard the formation of Feline Oral Resorptive Lesions, and be anti- plaque. Step 6. Treatment planning: This step is where the teeth and entire oral cavity are evaluated, using not only our eyes, but a periodontal probe to determine if there is a periodontal pocket. Finally, dental radiographs are taken to determine the extent of the disease process present. Using all of these modalities, a plan is developed (with the owners input) to reestablish the patient's oral health. Step 7. Dental Charting: All of the pertinent oral findings and treatment rendered and planned in the future is placed on a dental chart in the patients permanent medical record. This will allow the veterinarian to follow the patients progress (or regression) through the years. These are the steps that we follow to ensure that the patient leaves with a clean mouth. However, dental care does not end there. Within 24 hours, plaque has already started to form on the teeth, and the periodontal disease process starts over. This is where Home Care comes in. Imagine what would happen in your mouth if you never brushed your teeth, all the cleanings in the world won't keep your mouth healthy.
Santa Monica Veterinarian Reshma Bijlani DVM
1534 14th Street Santa Monica, California 90404 Schedule an Appointment
Santa Monica Pet Medical Center